Removing autumn leaves?

I know many do remove the autumn leaves before they drop. I do not. For the obvious reason that the tree needs all the back flow of nutrients it can get before going into dormancy. It is a natural process, where the decaying leafs turns off their photosynthesis as days gets shorter and colder. Nutrients flow back and are stored for the following spring in stem, trunk and roots. There the stored nutrients will change their balance of frost protection for variations in temperatures during the cold period, and when spring arrives they will be activated and be the first gasoline for a fresh start of a new seasons growth.

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Removing leafs before time, is therefore a little too hasty in the wish of getting trees nice and tidy for the winter, taking away the last feed for wintertime.

I clean of the withered leaves from the pot surfaces and benches when they are dropped, too avoid pests and fungus. But not before. Only trees that do not drop there leaves when they are entirely brown and dead, are cut off, for the same reasons. Beech for example keeps most of their leaves on during winter, but that is not necessary when overwintered as bonsai in a protected place, away from snow and cold sallow winds.

Always make an autumn clean up, to secure the health of the trees, but in time – not before time.

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Enjoying bonsai before the rain

Heavy rain showers are announced, so I set up the daily display without using scroll or tables. Just protect these from the weather later. Sun is still shining, so it is about enjoying before we will be inside the house mostly the next days.

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Cotoneaster shohin favourites

The Cotoneaster is among my all time favourites for shohin-bonsai. especially for Mame-bonsai (from 9,5 cm and down), because it is slightly draught tolerant, and can develop a fine root system for the extremely small pots used.

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Cotoneaster × suecicus ‘Coral Beauty’ is one of the varieties among the Cotoneaster specimens that are particularly good for Shohin bonsai. It is a summer flowering specimen, and therefore it sets its flower buds during spring. If you want flowers, you should not prune after the dormant period in winter, when leaves have dropped.

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Other (but fewer) varieties are evergreens, as it is the case with the Cotoneaster microphylla. As other types of Cotoneaster it has white flowers followed by red or orange fruits in autumn. C. microphylla is a spring flowering specimen, and therefore it is necessary to stop pruning before fall, when the flower buds for spring are produced. If pruned in autumn/fall, you risk pruning away the small flower buds that are prepared for spring.

Cotoneasters are very tolerant regarding soil types and watering. They also willingly produce a massive amount of new growth when pruned hard. As long as they are fed well and taken care of, this the tree every shohin grower should have in their collection, if the specimen is available in your location. They are found in nature from western China towards Northern Europe.

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In midd-summer it is advisable to keep the pot and tree semi shaded during the hot part of the day, were the sun will heat up the soil and roots. In winter keep the tree from freezing in several days, and place it protected from winds (best choice is a greenhouse) because the leaves still will be evaporating trough the leaves, especially if exposed for the sun. Leaves and branches will dry out when the soil is frozen and cant take up water for evaporation.

 

 

 

 

Spring rain

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Acer palmatum, shohin.

It has been pouring cats and dogs all Easter, so it is surprising that the trees are still going on with their spring thing despite cold and wet weather. It has been a very mild winter, so everything seems to be pushed forward by this, despite the disappointing missing sun and heat now. A good thing though, is that it will keep the trees from flowering too short and too early, maybe be a good timing for the annual exhibition within three weeks from now, in the Danish Bonsai Society. Crossing fingers, and everything might be just in time.

 

Shimpaku upside down

For a number of years I have been growing a small Juniperus Shimpaku, and followed the original position until now. The tree was purchased as a semi-finished piece at the Mansei-en nursery in Omiya, Japan, of late Saburo Kato in 2005, and mainly bought as a memory of the time spent with this most respected bonsai artist. One of a few I could afford.

2005. Original bonsai after purchase at Mansei-en.
2005. Original bonsai after purchase at Mansei-en.

I named the tree “Kato” for the very same reason. To remember a personality and respected artist who as one of a few, deserved to be entitled master. A misused phrase put on too many people nowadays who still needs to deserve this predicate after proving years of dedicated high quality work.

Back to the tree. After a few years of training, a tree in this size usually needs some restoration, some work that brings it back in shape. I originally had to reduce the slightly overgrown canopy after the purchase, and after that I managed to keep it in it`s form for some time. The shari (trunk deadwood) was only worked on sparsely, and I enhanced the deadwood some years ago to add some interest to it. I also extended it a little to make it better.

2005. Working the deadwood to bring in more age and interest.
2005. Working the deadwood to bring in more age and interest.

Time gone, and the tree needed to be reduced a little again in 2017. New growth was developed further back, so I now had the opportunity to reduce the length and keep the size limited. This made me think of a new possible style of the tree. A simple change with a huge effect, with little effort done.

Trying out the new position.
Trying out the new positions.

Where growth was removed new jins (deadwood branches) have been created, and this opened for a new vision of the tree. Same pot, but new position changes the view and expression of the tree. Only rearranging the left part of some roots was necessary. I was able to tilt the tree, so it performs much better now to my taste.

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The repotting was done carefully, not disturbing the roots much. The new inclining position also lifted some older roots to the surface, that in future will be a good visual nebari adding strength to the image when the soil carefully is removed little by little over time.

Mind the gap. When positioning a cascade or semi-cascade bonsai it is of great importance to leave air between the trunk and the pot. A convincing cascade bonsai shows it`s strength only if it is able to hold it self and not supporting it by resting at the edge of the pot. Keeping air between the pot and trunk is therefore an important detail.

Click the gallery below for larger pictures.